Blue Island Victory


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Photo

Title     Blue Island Victory
Photographer     woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user
Portfolio     other things
Category     Vintage
Scanner     Epson Perfection 4490 Photo
Content advisory     G (general audiences)
Submitted     January 11, 2007 8:14:10 PM CST
Views     1,437
Rating     3 Thumb-up

I'm 99.9% sure that this shot was taken at the Newport News Shipyard in Newport News, Virginia in the very early 1940's.

I realize that the horizon is not level but to level it and crop would cause a loss of a large portion of the shot so I left it as shot.

Another negative that is in excellent condition. Curves and slight selective color adjustments. A full frame post.

The title is the name of the ship. Does anyone know why horses would be loaded on a ship?

Edit: A link to some history of this type of ship.

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Thumb-up    from rrayfield/Robert (53,638) Send mail to this user on January 11, 2007 9:43:49 PM CST (3) Early critique

I agree with Kevin about the mid-tone contrast.

These are great shots. Please keep posting. Cheers, r

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From woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user on January 12, 2007 7:58:28 PM CST

Thank Robert. There might be another 4 or 5 shots that are not of family members that might be of interest and I'll post them soon. Thanks for your time.

David

Thumb-up Thumb-up    from kevinpa/Kevin (11,044) Send mail to this user on January 11, 2007 8:49:41 PM CST (2) Early critique

David,

I think a adding some more mid tone contrast would help here, along with converting it to RGB and adding some black to the gray using selective color in PS (I played with it some).

Maybe the horses were headed to Europe for the war, just a thought. I am sure you could find some old shipping records for this ship some place if you do some research. I know I did a few years back on a ship whose christening bottle I had that was launched in 1918.

All the best,

Kevin

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From woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user on January 12, 2007 7:56:53 PM CST

Thanks Kevin. I did some research last night and found little except that this ship was damaged in a collision in Dec '46 in the North Atlantic. It is intresting though and I keep looking.

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From rrayfield/Robert (53,638) Send mail to this user on January 11, 2007 9:41:04 PM CST

" Does anyone know why horses would be loaded on a ship?"

David, horses can't swim great distances.

From kevinpa/Kevin (11,044) Send mail to this user on January 12, 2007 6:14:53 AM CST

LOL

From woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user on January 12, 2007 7:59:06 PM CST

Touche' my friend, Touche' :)

From jroessler/John (15,842) This user is a Premium Member Send mail to this user on January 12, 2007 6:54:04 AM CST

Horses are used in the mfg of some glues and I believe especially the French like to eat them. It is generally no longer practicable to herd them any distance and shipping by ocean sometimes is cheaper than rail.

From woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user on January 12, 2007 7:53:52 PM CST

I suppose it is possible that these horses were on their way to France as a food source then.

From mmcjwo/Joe (163) Send mail to this user on January 15, 2007 6:45:55 PM CST

It's hard to imagine that they would ship them live. I think it would be more effective to process them stateside. Perhaps they were ARRIVING from Europe. I found this interesting item "Post-World War II Importations of Horses from the European Theater to the United States" here. It includes this statement which may answer the question: "This first importation totaled 150 animals, including 65 thoroughbreds. They were shipped from Bremerhaven, Germany and arrived at Newport News on October 29, 1945."

From woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user on January 15, 2007 7:20:39 PM CST

This is very interesting Joe and thanks for the link.

My reasoning that these horses were being sent overseas was

1. Horse meat is consumed by the French and it stood to reason that food shortages near or just after the end of the war were likely.

2. The horses were likely be shipped live to avoid possible bad press. Proper refrigeration might have been an issue also.

3. There is an island fairly close by where horese run wild and the ponies are rounded up once a year for auction even to this day the last I heard.

4. There were some 473 ships of this type built in the early to mid '40s and the later ones were given rather ambiguous names like this one.

5. But whatever the case there was something special about this scene for my dad to take this shot. Out of hundreds of negatives there may be 6 or 8 that are not your typical family snapshot.

From woodenman/David (6,650) Send mail to this user on January 15, 2007 7:27:19 PM CST

Chincoteague ponies

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