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Halogen Lights and Film

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From bettylovekitten/Erica (1,279) Send mail to this user on September 18, 2003 8:40:01 PM CDT

Okay i'm looking to get some halogen work lights. what kind of film would work well with this. I think I intend on using natural light and the halogen light, but also just the halogen. anyone have any suggestions?

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From robertwallis/Robert (14,977) This user is a Premium Member This user is an Administrator Send mail to this user on September 18, 2003 10:59:27 PM CDT

Use tungsten balanced film; there's several transparencies and 1 or 2 negative color films out there.

Be warned that halogen work lamps are not at the standard 3200 Kelvin color temp that the films are balanced for. There's about a 300 to 400 Kelvin difference. They will still have a slight red shift (think beginning liver failure-orange skin tones) with the transparencies, and the addition of 10-15CC units of cyan will balance it out when printing. Daylight film with the Halogens will look like incipient demise from liver shutdown. Just don't take the film to a one-hour lab where a kid runs the printer, or it'll never be done right.

My advice is to use fast color print film and use an 80B filter on the lens. You'll lose 2 stops of light, but it makes everything a whole lot easier.

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From bettylovekitten/Erica (1,279) Send mail to this user on September 18, 2003 11:15:46 PM CDT

when looking for tungsten balanced film where exactly do i look and how do i know what kind it is?i guess just go to a lab and ask for tungsten balanced film?

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From robertwallis/Robert (14,977) This user is a Premium Member This user is an Administrator Send mail to this user on September 18, 2003 11:27:33 PM CDT

Kodak Ektachrome 160 is a good choice, as is a slower version around ISO 50 or 64. Fuji has a couple with similar speeds as well as a negative film which I'm guessing is T100. Go to the B&H website or better yet go to Freestyle's website. 3M used to have an ISO640 film, 640T, which is still available from Freestyle (kept frozen for years) that is cheap and has the most ungodly grain you've ever seen in your life. It's so coarse, it's charming. The grain is multi-colored, and it would be tough to do the effect well with PS. It's an E-6 film so anyone can process it. Very soft and muted look to it.

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From crittergm/Critter (4,420) Send mail to this user on September 19, 2003 10:44:49 AM CDT

Color is overrated. Black & White soaks up halogens like a warm loaf of bread with a slather of butter. Add some diffusion and it get's positively garlicy.

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From arjen/Arjen (21,117) Send mail to this user on September 19, 2003 5:40:50 PM CDT

Something else to keep in mind: the colour of halogen light and daylight are very different. If you conmbine the two on daylight film, the halogen light will look yellow/orange. If you combine them on tungsten film the daylight will look blue. This is useful if you want to be creative with this kind of stuff. If you want everything to look realistic you will have to filter the lights with blue 80A gels. They soak up two stops of light, and you wust be careful not to block ventilation in the lamp to not overheat it. Alternatively you could filter the daylight with amber gels over the windows adn use tungsten film.

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From 134782.deleted/deleted (34) Send mail to this user on September 22, 2003 4:52:37 AM CDT

I am surprised no one has mentioned the fact you can Gel lights (flashheads or hot lights) to any color temperature you want.
The same folks or their kin who lead new photographers away from shooting under hot lights are now leading the charge to digital cameras which, by any sane reasoning and by all rights, are the very people who should be using "hot lights" to obtain the best results from their cameras.

Gelled "hot lights" give the photographer that "WYSIWYG" effect totally missing in flash photography.

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From topazhn/Helen (1,028) Send mail to this user on September 22, 2003 7:50:09 AM CDT

The point Mr. Mafud makes too right. Manufacturers are interested in making money. So they are going to push any new item or technology that will make cash for them.
This problem of color balance is not new. This page on a very informative website discusses the Mired System. There is a listing of color correction filters, cross referenced to different companys; a list of temperatures from different light sources is given. The data needed to impliment the Mired system in the field can fit easily on a memo in a PDA.

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